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Window Treatments without Curtains

This slightly wider window size, as with small windows, would benefit from a window dressing that does not include curtains. The first illustration below (left) shows a shaped pelmet with a roller blind trimmed to match. 

 

Beware of mixing different shaped bottom fascias on the same window, as the designs will clash. If you choose a shaped bottom for a pelmet or valance then go for a straight blind or one with the same shaping as the pelmet or valance.

 

The two windows below (middle and right) illustrate the effect achieved when both pelmet and blind have the same shaped fascia. By placing the blinds outside the window recesses the windows appear wider.

A roller blind with a straight lower edge compliments a very decorative stiff pelmet An odd number of scallops is always more effective

If a stiff pelmet is too formal for the look you are trying to achieve, then substitute a valance with a co-ordinating blind. A valance with a hand-stitched heading will give a tailored look, whereas a gathered valance is much softer.

Formal Window Treatments with Curtains

If you are considering a more formal window treatment with curtains, then take a look at the following illustrations, they might be just what you are looking for. You might even be lucky enough to have a pair of similar windows within the same room. If so, a formal window dressing on two identical windows alongside one another looks particularly impressive.
Sash windows are usually this size and are much easier to dress than those with a greater width. They are frequently a little longer but the width may be similar. Long curtains look particularly elegant on this type of window and can be functional draw curtains or permanently dressed. For dress curtains, consider installing a blind into the recess that can be drawn when privacy is required.
On the left below, we have a box pleated valance with a trimming to a lower edge set on a straight piped band. This gives a lovely tailored look. The dress curtains have the same trimming to the leading edge, and the roller blind is edged to match.
In the middle, we have a most elegant window treatment. It has a scalloped valance with a pinch pleat heading, and a trimming to the lower edge. The curtains are functional and yet the additional roller blind adds that finishing touch by having a shaped lower edge echoing the shaping on the pelmet.
In the final sketch on the right, you can see that adding a knotted rope trim to the bottom of a hand stitched heading is very effective. The triple pleats are much closer together than in the illustration to the left. The relatively simple straight roller blind enhances the overall tailored look. A shaped blind would appear too fussy

A shaped stiff pelmet and formally dressed curtains with co-ordinating tiebacks works well here. The shaping on the roller blind again mirrors the shaping on the pelmet.

Functional  Window Treatments with Curtains

Draw curtains could well be required in a bedroom to give privacy and to help cut out the light. Radiators beneath windows may cause problems in these situations, as delicate fabrics or those with a high percentage of natural fibres in their content can react adversely to heat.
On the left below, a goblet pleated valance with a shaping to the lower edge makes this relatively simple window dressing quite effective.
However, as shown in the sketch on the right, a softer feminine look is achieved with a puff ball heading on a shaped valance.  Note how the trimming on the lower edge of the valance adds definition
Using tiebacks on such short curtains will inevitably cause some creasing of the fabric and this then spoils the line of the curtains when drawn.

If it is possible to have long curtains rather than short on a relatively small window, the finished effect will be much more elegant. The window appears much longer and the extra curtain depth means that the sides of the valance can be extended to give a lovely arched effect.

Please visit us again soon to find out more about designing wide, large and bay window dressings.

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  Last modified: January 04, 2009